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Posted on 5. March 2020

Coronavirus: What to Know & What to Do

By Nufactor

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With the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on the minds of many Americans, IG Living recognizes patients may have questions regarding the safety of their infusion therapy and what to do to protect themselves from contracting the disease.

According to the Plasma Protein Therapeutics Association (PPTA)1, the "outbreak is not a concern for the safety of plasma protein therapies manufactured by PPTA member companies." Additionally, "existing manufacturing methods provide significant safety margins against" the virus that causes COVID-19.2

IG Living is dedicated to providing patients and providers with the education and support to complete treatment successfully. Therefore, we want to provide you with some information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) to help address any concerns.

General Facts from CDC and WHO for Everyday Preventive Actions to Help Prevent the Spread of Respiratory Diseases:

  • If you are sick (cough/fever), don't go to work or school. Stay home and contact your primary care physician for guidance.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Wash your hands with soap for 20 seconds frequently, especially after going to the bathroom, before eating or after coughing/sneezing. Singing "Happy Birthday" two times through is about 20 seconds. If soap is not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your face/nose/eyes.
  • If you cough or sneeze, do so into a tissue and immediately dispose of the tissue and wash your hands. If a tissue is unavailable, cough/sneeze into the crook of your elbow.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Use of facemasks:
    • CDC does not recommend the use of masks for the general public.
    • Facemasks should be worn by people with known COVID-19 infection.
    • Healthcare providers should wear masks in accordance with CDC recommendations when providing care to someone known to have COVID-19.
  • If you believe you may have COVID-19, contact your primary care physician for guidance.

All Countries Must Help to Prevent Transmission of COVID-19

On Feb. 28, 2020, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus held a media briefing to advise what countries must do to help prevent onward transmission of COVID-19.3 "It calls for all countries to educate their populations, to expand surveillance, to find, isolate and care for every case, to trace every contact, and to take an all-of-government and all-of-society approach – this is not a job for the health ministry alone."

Please refer to CDC and WHO for additional up-to-date information on COVID-19.

 

References:

1.   New Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and Plasma Protein Therapies (updated Feb. 17, 2020). Accessed at
https://www.pptaglobal.org/media-and-information/ppta-statements/1055-2019-novel-coronavirus-2019-ncov-and-plasma-protein-therapies.
2.   Interim Infection Prevention and Control Recommendations for Patients with Confirmed Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) or Persons Under Investigation for COVID-19 in Healthcare Settings (updated Feb. 21, 2020). Accessed at
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/infection-control/control-recommendations.html.
3.   WHO Director-General's Opening Remarks at the Media Briefing on COVID-19, Feb. 28, 2020. Accessed at
https://www.who.int/dg/speeches/detail/who-director-general-s-opening-remarks-at-the-media-briefing-on-covid-19---28-february-2020.

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Comments (2) -

Melinda walker
6:01 PM on Friday, March 27, 2020

I am so confused.   I have read conflicting information concerning how long the virus lives on surfaces  like my grocery sacks and plastic bags, frozen food  packages. Cans, mail , boxes in the mail
And others.  
I also thought if you did not get sick within 14 days and are isolating  in your home then you could assume you are ok.  Now I read virus can be silent.   for 7-10 days and you have only a runny nose for a few days before you get extremely ill.   When Can I feel safe in my isolation?     I had my monthly infusion today (Privigen and steroid). I have had runny nose and sneezing off and on for 10-12 days.   Last time leaving my apt before today was March 16.   I have remained in my home with exception of March 16 dr visit and infusion today.  Please give me what answers you can.   817-614-7111

Abbie Cornett
9:52 AM on Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Hello Melinda. I am the patient advocate for IG living. I will email you directly with an answer to your question.

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